Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference on Power and Energy Engineering Munich, Germany.

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Day 1 :

Power Engineering 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Nasir El Bassam photo
Biography:

Nasir El Bassam is a Scientific Director of the International Research Centre for Renewable Energy (IFEED), Germany, India and USA and Poverty Researcher, promoting the development of Concentrated Solar  Thermal  Power  (CSP)  in  cooperation  with  German  Aerospace Centre  (DLR),  and  German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Berlin, serving  in  several  committees, and is  EU  Adviser  & Chairman  of  working  group  SREN, FAO, UNO. In this context, he worked out the UN-Concept of Integrated Energy Settlements. He has been nominated as Chair, World Council of Renewable Energy (WCRE), Vice President of the Climate Protection Agency and member of Editorial Board of scientific journals. He published more than 10 books, author of numerous publications, and received several awards.

Abstract:

Energy is directly related to the most critical social issues which affect sustainable development: Poverty, job creation, income levels, access to social services, gender disparity, population growth, agricultural production, climate change and environmental quality, security issues and migration. More than 2 bil­lion people, 600 million of them living in Africa, have no access to modern energy sources such as electricity; most are living in rural areas. Sustainable frameworks which can really function and could offer real perspectives are needed: IFEED has developed more than 10 years ago for the United Nations the concept of the “Integrated Energy Settlements” which has been implemented in several counties. The concept comprises the following elements: Decentralized and onsite production of energy for households, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), agriculture, water and waste water treatment, mobility, storage, trade, etc., it also includes social, economic, ecological, education and job creation components. This concept is a dynamic process. It has been modified and implemented in October 2015 in Wierthe, Lower Saxony, Germany. The project in Wierthe integrates 15 enterprises with around 80 employees and trainees, education, training  and sport facilities, a forest, fruit and vegetable fields, bee, sheep and horse keeping, e-cars, solar park, bioenergy for heating, desalination and irrigation systems. Wierthe Project is an innovative approach and a concept for maintaining the vital role of rural regions. It targets food and energy, nature and culture, diversity and dignity, economy and society. It combines strategic approaches of clean technologies and sustainable development to live in peace with our self and nature. We have the necessary knowledge, knowhow and the technologies to achieve these goals. 

Power Engineering 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tzu-Chen Hung photo
Biography:

Tzu-Chen Hung received his PhD degree in Mechanical Engineering from UCLA, USA in 1989. From 1990 to 1992, he served as a Nuclear Engineer at Argonne National Laboratory. After 2008, he has been serving as a Professor and the Associate Dean of the College of Mechanical & Electrical Engineering at National Taipei University of Technology (NTUT) in Taiwan. He has been honored as a Distinguished Professor since 2016. He also served as the Chief Executive for the Committee of Recruitment for Technological Colleges and Universities, Ministry of Education, Taiwan for 5 years. His major research fields are organic Rankine cycle (ORC), computational fluid dynamics, passive heat transfer, and nuclear engineering. Three of his ORC papers have been cited more than 1,500 times worldwide. He has also delivered more than 10 invited/keynote/plenary lectures in international conferences or foreign universities. He has published more than 80 journal papers and more than 150 conference papers. He has been a Guest Editor of 3 international journals. He has served as Host or Committee Member for more than 10 domestic and international conferences. 

Abstract:

Unlike conventional power conversion from fuel source, organic Rankine cycle (ORC) can efficiently convert wasted low-temperature heat to power. That’s why it is said as a “negative carbon” approach in power generation. Moreover, with rising concerns in environment and global warming, ORC for waste heat recovery is expected commercially enormous. A special advantage of ORC is that it has wide spectrum in the selection of working fluid to fit optimal power generation. In general, near isentropic fluids are more favorable. Systematic studies have been worldwide implemented for the selection of appropriate working fluids with respect to the evaporation temperature, available temperature range, operational safety, and environment friendly, etc. All expander feature, heat exchanger behavior and pump performance significantly influence the cycle operation characteristic. Therefore, how to efficiently integrate ORC processes with various conditions of heat sources and sinks is a challenge for ORC commercialization. The stand-alone operation strategy can run steadily at random operation zone, whereas the gird connect operation strategy is suitable for greater heat input. ORC systems have been generally commercialized with the scale greater than 50 kWe. Nowadays, laboratory-scale ORCs have gradually obtained good cycle performance for the liquid heat source less than 120°C. Once small-scale ORC is commercialized, the applications would be more and more flexible. The economic analysis of the ORC systems is performed according to the module costing technique, in which various kinds of economic factors have been proposed, such as APR (heat exchanger area per unit power output), LEC (levelized energy cost), EPC (electricity production cost), etc. Electricity supply is a critical problem in developing or undeveloped territories. We expect that low-cost ORC could be employed in those areas to improve their living standard.

Keynote Forum

L Q Wang

The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Keynote: Beyond classical heat transfer
Power Engineering 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker L Q Wang photo
Biography:

L Q Wang received his PhD from University of Alberta (Canada) in 1995 and is a Full Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, the University of Hong Kong. He is also the Qianren Scholar (Zhejiang) and serves as the Director and the Chief Scientist for the Laboratory for Nanofluids and Thermal Engineering, Zhejiang Institute of Research and Innovation (HKU-ZIRI), the University of Hong Kong. He has secured over 70 projects funded by diverse funding agencies and industries including the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong, the National Science Foundation of China and the Ministry of Science and Technology of China, and has published 10 books/monographs and over 340 book chapters and technical articles, many of which have been widely used by researchers all over the world. He is on the list of the top 1% most cited scholars. He has also filed 22 patent applications and led a team in developing a state-of-the-art thermal control system for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) on the International Space Station. He was Visiting Professor of Harvard University (2008) and Duke University (2003). He has presented over 35 invited plenary/keynote lectures at international conferences, and serves/served as the Editor-In-Chief for the Advances in Transport Phenomena, the Editor for the Scientific Reports, the Associate Editor for the Current Nanoscience, the Guest Editor for the Journal of Heat Transfer, the Nanoscale Research Letters and the Advances in Mechanical Engineering, and serves on the Editorial Boards of 19 international journals.

Abstract:

Unlike the past century that was blessed with ever-abundant cheap oil, this century energy has been rated as the single most important issue faced by humanity. Over 80% of all the energy we are using today is produced in or through the form of heat. Engineering heat-transfer process and medium with super thermal performance is thus vital for addressing the terawatt challenge faced by us. Driving force for heat transfer can be direct or indirect. The former is temperature gradient with conduction, convection and radiation as its three fundamental ways of heat transport. The latter comes from cross-coupling among different transport processes in the medium and transports heat in thermal waves which can be in various forms and tunable via manipulating the cross coupling. The first part of this talk is on developing a universal relation between heat flux and temperature gradient in temperature-gradient-driven heat transfer by finding both the necessary and sufficient conditions in a systematic, rigorous way for a heat transfer process to satisfy fundamental laws like the second Law of Thermodynamics. This leads to a generalized Fourier law that provides effective means for engineering temperature-gradient-driven heat-transfer processes with super thermal performance. It is normal that two or more transport processes occur simultaneously in heat-transfer media. Examples include mass, heat, chemical, electrical and magnetic transports. These processes may couple (interfere) and cause new induced effects of flows occurring without or against its primary thermodynamic driving force, which may be a gradient of temperature, or chemical potential, or reaction affinity. Two classical examples of coupled transports are the Soret effect (also known as thermodiffusion) in which directed motion of a particle or macromolecule is driven by flow of heat down a thermal gradient and the Dufour effect that is an induced heat flow caused by the concentration gradient. While the coupled transport is well recognized to be very important in thermodynamics, it has not been well appreciated yet in the society regarding its potential of generating and manipulating thermal waves and resonance. In the second part of this talk, I will summarize our work on examining such a potential and show some unique, super features of heat transport with cross-coupling-driven thermal waves and thermal resonance from our experiments with thermal-wave fluids consisting of specially-designed multiphase materials with multi-scale inner structures of micro-, nano- and subnano- sizes.

Keynote Forum

Robert Schlögl

Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Germany

Keynote: The role of synthetic fuels in sustainable energy systems

Time : 11:50-12:30

Power Engineering 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Robert Schlögl photo
Biography:

Robert Schlögl has research interest in fields like: Interfacial reactions of inorganic solids, heterogeneous catalysis, spectroscopy of surfaces during chemical reactions, solid state reactions, acid-base chemistry on surfaces, carbon chemistry, chemistry of oxide systems, cluster chemistry, development of concepts for sustainable chemical energy conversion and storage. He is presently the Director at Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft in Berlin as well as Founding Director of MPI for Chemical Energy Conversion in Muelheim an der Ruhr. He holds Honorary Professorships at Humboldt University Berlin, Technical University Berlin, University Duisburg-Essen, Ruhr University Bochum and is a Distinguished Associate Professor at TU Munich.

Abstract:

Efforts have been made in various regions of the world to reduce the role of fossil fuels in the energy mix. The motivation for this trend is manifold ranging from fears about insufficient resources to local cost structures and energy security arguments. The argument about protecting the global climate from the adverse effects of greenhouse gas emissions outside Europe is rarely the real driver for change. This has not substantially changed also after the accord of Paris in global warming. It should be understood that the term “energy system” describes the intricate interactions between technical, economic, and societal factors determining the local structure of energy supply to a society. Even within the globally close European countries there exist vast differences in structures of the energy system. Such diversity requires a broad consideration of measures and options of how to de-fossilize the energy supply. The seemingly easy answer to use solar primary electricity as substitute to fossil resources and to maximally electrify the energy system being postulated by “energy activists” is only an option at first glance. The sheer dimension of the transformation, cost arguments and the inherent volatility require always a dual energy system of material and free electrons as energy carriers. Dual systems require free convertibility of energy carriers in both directions. This is easy from material to free electrons but extremely difficult in the reverse direction. The presentation will highlight origins of this critical bottleneck for energy systems. It will be also shown that only C-H-O chemical structures are plentiful and diverse enough to serve as energy carriers. We will need to apply technologies of catalysis around the making and use of hydrogen as central “exchange currency” of future energy systems to overcome this bottleneck. The ideal function of hydrogen as an exchange energy carrier is not matched by its applicability as end user fuel. We need thus considering a man-made cycle of carbon in which CO2 is reacted with green hydrogen to form fuels that can be used to store, transport or utilize material energy and to serve as feedstock for the material chemical industry. Collection of the finally resulting CO2 can be done either at point sources directly or through biomass. It is filtering CO2 from the atmosphere for no human energy input. Biomass as “solid carbon” and not as energy carrier closes the carbon cycle when transformed into CO2 through fermentation or gasification at central sites. The structure of future energy system in terms of central vs. de-central is a critical issue and will be decided amongst other variables also by our ability to scale chemical energy conversion processes. The final merit order of energy systems will have to be judged in terms of systemic efficiency and stability rather than in comparative efficiency to fossil elements of a fragmented energy system. Mobility will serve as example to highlight this aspect that can lead to critical resistances against energy transformations.

Keynote Forum

Bin Zhu

Hubei University, P R China

Keynote: Semiconductor-ionic materials for new generation fuel cells

Time : 12:30-13:10

Power Engineering 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Bin Zhu photo
Biography:

Bin Zhu obtained PhD in 1997 from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. He has made tremendous efforts and innovations on fuel cells and new energy conversion technologies over 20 years. He has invented and developed ceria-composite electrolytes for low temperature (300-600°C) solid oxide fuel cells (LTSOFCs), the electrolyte-free fuel cell and single layer fuel cells based on novel functional semiconductor-ionic materials (SIMs). He has established a large research network and led several research teams to explore SIMs for advanced energy applications covering fuel cell, solar cell and photocatalysts/electrolysis. He is Principal Investigator and Lead for establishing and developing semiconductor-ionics and new generation energy technologies. He is one of the Most Cited Researchers in China (Energy sector) for 2014, 2015 and 2016, reports published by Elsevier in 2015, 2016 and 2017.

Abstract:

Currently two research fields are strongly correlated from semiconductor and ionic materials (SIMs), semiconductor physics and ionics, which have created "Three in one" electrolyte-free fuel cell technology (as illustrated in Figure 1) and science. Semiconductor electronic band can induce ionic conducting properties and band structure changes resulting in superionic conduction. Strongly crosslink approaches from electrons and ions based on extensive experimental discoveries and evidences have made a strong indication for a promising research frontier and new generation fuel cell as the semiconductor-ionic devices, e.g. electrolyte (layer)-free fuel cell (EFFC) and single layer fuel cells (SLFCs). This is because the semiconductor-ionic materials can integrate fuel cell all anode, electrolyte and cathode functions into one component/layer thus to realize the fuel cell. We are working on both theoretical approaches and experiments to develop and establish a new discipline on Semiconductor-Ionics (Semionics) for energy applications. Using existing semiconductor physics and theories, materials, we extend into the ionic properties and energy band modifications by ion effect, e.g. correlation with ions, and electron-ionic correlated transport properties thus facilitating fuel conversions with higher efficiencies. 

  • Power Engineering | Power Electronics | Power Systems | Power Generation Technologies | Power Transmission and Distribution | Smart Grid Technologies
Speaker

Chair

Nasir El Bassam

IFEED, Germany

Speaker

Co-Chair

Li Kaicheng

Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China

Speaker
Biography:

Enhua Wang has his expertise in evaluation and passion in improving the energy efficiency of various thermodynamic cycles such as waste heat recovery of internal combustion engine using organic Rankine cycle and dynamic Kalina cycle for low-temperature geothermal sources. His theoretical evaluation model based on numerical methods creates new pathways for improving efficiency of low-grade heat energy utilization. He has built this model after years of experience in research and evaluation in the universities. The foundation is based on an evaluation of a composition-adjustable Kalina cycle which is a methodology that improves the efficiency of Kalina cycle by regulate the mass fraction of the zeotropic mixture to match with changing ambient temperature This approach is useful in applications of low-grade heat energy harness.

Abstract:

Kalina cycle is a promising technology for power generation from low-temperature heat sources. Conventional air-cooled Kalina cycle for geothermal power plants are designed with a fixed condensation pressure determined by the local summer ambient temperature, which causes a huge amount of exergy destruction when air temperature drops. If the power plant can vary the condensing temperature with the ambient conditions, the plant’s annual average thermal efficiency would be improved. To address this challenge, this paper proposes a method to improve the energy efficiency of a Kalina cycle by adjusting its condensation pressure in situ to match the varying ambient temperature. A mathematical model is set up based on its working principle and then a numerical program is developed to analyze the cycle performance under various conditions. The dynamic condensation pressure adjustment in accordance to the changing ambient temperatures has been numerically demonstrated. Its effect on the system performance of a Kalina cycle over a year is then evaluated. The results indicate that, through matching the cycle with the changing ambient temperature via adjusting condensation pressure, the Kalina cycle can achieve much better annual average thermal efficiency than a conventional Kalina cycle without any adjustment if the mass fraction of ammonia-water mixture is selected in the right interval. For low-temperature geothermal power generation, this method can improve the energy efficiency evidently.

Speaker
Biography:

Jone F Chen received PhD degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He worked in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Institute of Microelectronics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan for more than 15 years, where he is currently a Professor. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

High voltage metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) transistors have been widely used in smart power management applications because of their compatibility with standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. Because high voltage MOS transistors are operated under high voltage, the off-state breakdown voltage and on-state drain current are two key device parameters. In addition, hot-carrier induced device degradation is an important reliability concern. One key factor to affect the off-state breakdown voltage, on-state drain current, and hot-carrier induced device degradation is the dimension of the device. In this paper, the effect of device dimension on device’s characteristics and hot-carrier reliability in our high voltage MOS transistors is investigated. Figure 1 shows the schematic cross section of the Si-based n-type high voltage MOS Transistors examined in this paper, where three important layout parameters: Lgs, Lg, and Lgd are depicted. The device with typical dimension (device A) and three more dimensions (devices B, C, and D with individually shortening Lgs, Lg, and Lgd by 0.1 mm) as seen in Figure 1 are examined. The effect of varying Lgs, Lg, or Lgd on off-state breakdown voltage, on-state drain current, and hot-carrier induced device degradation are examined. It was found that shortening Lgs, Lg, or Lgd enhances on-state drain current but degrades hot-carrier induced device degradation. Both experimental data and technology computer-aided-design (TCAD) simulation results are analyzed to explain the underlying physical mechanisms. Our findings reveal that care should be taken in determining the device dimension because a trade-off between on-state drain current and hot- carrier induced device degradation is observed.

Li Kaicheng

Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China

Title: Power quality disturbances detection based on strong trace filter
Speaker
Biography:

Li Kaicheng completed his PhD in 1998 from Huazhong University of Science and Technology. He is the Professor of this university and mainly focuses on research on electromagnetic measurement, power quality analysis and control, electronic instrument transformer, intelligent instrument, etc. He teaches courses such as “Signals and Systems”, “Sensors and Automatic Measurement”, “Weak signal detection” and so on. He published more than 100 papers and gained more than 10 patents and 5 government awards. Recently, he has done a lot of work on power quality analysis and detection under the support of Natural Science Foundation of China, and published more than 50 related papers.

Abstract:

Power quality disturbances (PQDs) detection plays a very important role in smart grid and customer safety, power quality evaluation, and power monitoring. Transient PQDs has strong impact on both grid and customer and bring serious consequences. Therefore, researches on transient PQDs detection are expected urgently in these days. The main challenges of transient PQDs detection are the interference caused by background noise and frequency deviation. This paper proposed a new method to detect transient power quality disturbances (PQDs) based on strong trace filter (STF). By appropriate filter model design, when there are stationary PQDs, the STF works as same as Kalman filter, while when there are transient disturbances, the STF indicates each sudden change of the distorted waveform by the fading factor (FF). The FF can also reveal which parameter of the signal component is changing and its sensitivity to sudden change can be tuned by the soften factor easily to avoid noise influence. Besides, the STF is a simple algorithm, which can be easily implemented on embedded system for real-time and time-varying detection. In addition, STF does not require synchronous sampling. Both simulation and experiment suggest that the STF is a good solution for transient PQDs detection. There is no doubt that the STF has a good prospect on transient PQDs detection.

Speaker
Biography:

Soon-Ung Park holds a BSc in Meteorology from the Seoul National University in Korea, an MSc in Meteorology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in USA and a PhD in Atmospheric Sciences from Oregon State University in USA. He had served at the Department of Atmospheric Sciences of Seoul National University in Korea as a Professor before he retired in 2006. As a Professor Emeritus of Seoul National University, he founded “Center for Atmospheric and Environmental Modeling (CAEM)” to pursue further studies on atmospheric environmental issues including air pollution dispersion, radionuclide dispersion, anthropogenic aerosols, dust aerosols, acidic rain and carbon cycles in forests. He has developed an operational Asian Dust Aerosol Model 2 (ADAM2) that is now used as a forecasting model in Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA). He is interested in the development of an Aerosol Modeling System including both dust and anthropogenic aerosols.

Abstract:

The Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) with the UM-LDAPS meteorological model in the horizontal grid scale of 1.5 × 1.5 km2 centered the power plant site has been employed to archive radionuclide (137Cs) dispersion database for the emergency responses at the early stage of the hypothetical accidental releases of radionuclide from the Uljin Nuclear Power Plant in Korea. The database includes 72 synoptic time-scale cases in a year. Each case has the spatial distributions of the hourly mean surface concentration, column integrated concentration and the hourly total deposition (wet+dry) of radionuclide in the model domain simulated by LPDM by releasing a Lagrangian particle per minute for 5 consecutive days at the site. The worst synoptic time-scale case (the highest surface concentration occurring case in the model domain) among 72 cases is chosen to be performed the LPDM model with the time dependent emission rate of the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident for the first 5 days for the provision of the required information for emergency responses including the affected areas, the moment of arrival of potential plume at critical locations, health effect, protective action guides at the early stage of the accident to assist emergency response managers in taking action to protect the public and environment. It is found that the presently archived database is very useful for the emergency response managers to take protective actions where and when concentrations of radioactivity are projected to be high and to establish the evacuation plans and emergency planning zones at the early stage of the accident by choosing a proper synoptic time-scale case from the archived database.

Speaker
Biography:

Marcel Weil finished his PhD in 2004 at the Technical University of Darmstadt, Institute of Water Supply and Groundwater Protection, Wastewater Technology, Waste Management, Industrial Material Cycles, Environmental and Spatial Planning (IWAR-Institute). Since 2011, he is heading a working group at the Helmholtz Institute Ulm for Electrochemical Energy Storage (HIU) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), in the topic field “Resources, Environment and Sustainability”. In addition he is since 2007, a Scientific Group Leader in the field “Systems Analysis and Constructive Technology Assessment (CTA) for Emerging Technologies” at the Institute for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis (ITAS) at KIT. He works as a Research Topic Leader (2015-2019) for “Energy Storage and Grid” of the German Helmholtz-Initiative “Energy System 2050” within the research topic “Life-Cycle-Oriented Sustainability Assessment”.

 

Abstract:

The German energy turnaround is considered as a big challenge, due to the necessity of the integration of a high share in fluctuating renewable energy sources within the energy grid. The complexity will increase also due to the growth of active stakeholders, decentralized energy production and trans-sectoral connections (e.g. mobility and heat demand sector). Experts are convinced that energy storage will play an important role with the future grid (Figure 1). But the predictions how much energy storage capacity we need for short, mid, and long term until 2050 differ significantly. In any case will the future application and broad dissemination of energy storage depend on the cost development per kWh. For electrochemical energy storage (batteries) a strong production cost reduction is predicted until 2030, with potentially costs below 200 €/kWhs. But production costs are not sufficient to compare an economic base energy storage options with different technology performance (e.g. energy density, charge/discharge efficiency, calendric life time, cycle life time). Instead cost has to be analyzed over the whole life cycle (from resource extraction, production, use phase and recycling or waste management) for the different considered applications with respective specific load profiles. For the investigation four stationary applications are considered: 1. Electric time shift (ETS)/, “Arbitrage” (Energy/Power = 4); 2. Increase of photovoltaics self-consumption (PVSC, Energy/Power = 3.2); 3. Primary regulation (PR, Energy/Power = 1); 4. Renewables support (RS, Energy/Power = 10). The presented work compares the economic and ecological performance of 8 different battery options, including diverse Li-Ion and redox flow batteries. The effects of parameter variations are investigated within a sensitivity analysis.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Said El Beid received the BIng and Master’s degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering (with honors) from Hassan II University, Morocco and the PhD degree in Electrical Engineering (with honors) from Cadi Ayyad University, Morocco. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at Chouaib-Doukkali University, Morocco where he is a Member of the Laboratory of Engineering Sciences for Energy since 2015 and he is a Member of the Laboratory of Electrical Systems and Telecommunications in Cadi Ayyad University since 2007. He is also an IEEE member since 2007 and a member of the reviewing committee of IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics, Frontiers of Information Technology & Electronic Engineering journal and Universal Journal of Control and Automation. He has participated in several national and international research projects. He has published several papers in reputed international journals and international conferences. His main areas of research interest are power electronics, switching-mode power supplies, modeling and control of DC–DC converters and multilevel converters, and nonlinear systems.

Abstract:

The design and the implementation of a TS fuzzy modeling and control applied to two level and three level DC-DC converters that operate in large-signal domain are presented. Unlike conventional fuzzy controller design which addresses only small-signal system control, the proposed approach ensures good performances and high accuracy of the modeling and control system over the whole operating space. This links to: i) The ability of dealing with the nonlinearity present in the conversion ratio of the DC–DC converters by means of a Takagi–Sugeno fuzzy approximator; ii) The skill to automatically derive the corresponding small-signal model for the converters under a wide range of operating conditions using TS fuzzy modeling approach. According to the TS fuzzy technique, the proposed control techniques vary from self-tuning PI control to the state-feedback based control using Parallel Distributed Compensation (PDC) concept. Experimental results using dSPACE DS1104 board, two level and three level DC-DC converters, for different operating conditions, illustrate the efficiency, the robustness and the flexibility of the proposed approach.

Biography:

Abstract:

The use of Zn(O,S) buffer layers in place of CdS with Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells has been explored. The primary argument for the use of Zn(O,S) is that its higher bandgap, a second reason, the focus of my talk, is that the conduction-band offset (CBO) can be tuned to a more optimal value through modification of the oxygen-to-sulfur ratio. Our calculations show that the target oxygen composition at room temperature based on band-offset considerations alone should decrease from above 90% for CIS to approximately 50% for CGS. The conduction-band offset (CBO) of the Zn (O,S)/window layer heterojunction also can play significant roles in the performance of solar cells. Thin film solar cells with the structure soda lime glass/Mo/Cu(In,Ga)Se2/Zn(O,S)/ZnMgO/ZnO:Al are discussed for varying sulfur content of the Zn(O,S) buffer layer and Mg content of ZnMgO. In this talk, some new ideas in material science for improving CIGS cells fabricating in NREL and ZSW would be presented.